Artist Series

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Artist Statement 
Back to Nature (2015)

From killing for profit to preservation, our relationship with whales has undergone a radical transformation over the last three centuries, driven by our evolving ethical values.

During the heyday of 19th-century American whaling, there were no notions of environmentalism. We saw whales as an exploitable commodity to support human industrial endeavors. Increasing levels of pollution in the 20th century led to the birth of Environmentalism. The "deep ecology" of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, a philosophical response to the environmental movement, now advocates for the inherent worth of living beings regardless of their utilitarian purpose to humans.

My sculptures represent milestones in the transformation of our relationship with whales.



"19th c. Open Wound"
Stoneware, wheelthrown and altered. 2015


"19th c. Harpoon, Rib Cage, Barrel: Hunt for Liquid Gold"
Stoneware, wheelthrown and altered. 2015


"20th c. Whale Processed for Commodities"
Stoneware. Wheelthrown and altered. 2015


"20th c. Whale Entanglement and Pollution: Human Hazard Continues"
Stoneware. Wheelthrown and altered. 2015


"21st c. Deep Ecology"
Stoneware. Wheelthrown and altered. 2015

***
These sculputres were on view for a year at the Museum of America and the Sea at Mystic Seaport, CT, as part of the self-curated group show by the artists of Dalvero Academy, called "Journey of Transformation: An Exploration of Our Evolving Relationship With the Whale"




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Porcelain Grove (2017)